4 tips for massive arms

Being involved in strength sports for the past
several years I’ve almost completely eliminated
direct arm work from my workouts.

My arms just grow from doing heavy presses
and rows.

But like I’ve mentioned in other e mails…

…I’m “experimenting” with a little bodybuilding ;)

So I’ve decided to add “arms exercises” back into
my routine in the past few weeks.

LOL – I know, I know… I look like such a geek!

The fact is that I am NOT an arm training expert.

So, I scraped up this article from Pro Bodybuilder and
Author of the Mass Intentions Muscle Building System,
Ben Pakulski, that I found pretty helpful.

4 Uncommon Tips To BIGGER ARMS
By Ben Pakulski

1) LESS VOLUME!

Small muscles require less volume, and recover faster. Basic logic says,
a smaller muscle has less overall total volume of muscle fibres. It takes
LESS overall stimulus to fatigue these muscles and less overall training
volume to exhaust glycogen stores (stored muscle energy).

2) HEAVY WEIGHTS (WITH PERFECT FORM)

Heavy weights are going to fatigue a greater overall percentage of muscle
fibres in a shorter amount of time (aka less sets). Heavy weights also have
the added benefit of stimulating “high threshold motor units”. These are the
muscle fibres that require a lot more stimulus to grow and respond, but also
the fibres that are more likely to be responsible for muscle hypertrophy or
GROWTH!

3) ARMS RECEIVE A LOT OF STIMULUS ON A REGULAR BASIS

Arms receive a lot of stimulus on a regular basis. For most people, this tends to
occur in the middle of the range of motion where the muscles are strongest.
In order to get the arms to grow and respond, it is necessary to subject them to
a different type of stimulus.

One of the best ways to improve arm development is to subject them to more
tension and continuous tension at the extremes of the range of motion (a.k.a,
when a muscle is fully lengthened or fully shortened –where muscles are weakest).
This will allow for greater time under tension as well as targeting different points
of the strength curve to force the nervous system to adapt and stimulate new
muscle growth.

4) YOU MUST ENGAGE THE TARGET MUSCLE FIRST IN ANY
MOVEMENT

The FIRST muscle to engage in ANY movement must be the muscle you are trying
to target. If you are working your biceps, to most effectively stimulate the bicep, it
must be the muscle to initiate the movement. As mentioned, muscles are weakest at
those extremes and that makes it LEAST likely to contract. This is where your
conscious intent and control is vital!

The best way to ensure this is happening is to CONTRACT its antagonist muscle.
This will ensure a fully lengthened working muscle and make it much more likely
that it will initiate the movement(provided you’re using proper control).

e.g. when working your bicep, to fully stretch your bicep at the bottom of the range,
it is necessary to contract your tricep before initiating the movement of contracting
your bicep again.The opposite is true when training triceps. Contract your biceps at
he top of the range when a tricep is fully stretched(forearm touches biceps).

Ben Pakulski, Mr. Olympia Competitor
and author Mass Intentions Bodybuilding

Mass Intentions Bodybuilding is on sale this week,
learn more at the website below.

http://www.hulsestrength.com/recommends/mi40

Grow Stronger,
Elliott Hulse